Sunday, 10 December 2017

Oral Care During the Holidays: Sugar-Free Countdown to Christmas

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by Sher Warkentin

Maintaining good oral care during the holidays can be tough with the bombardment of sugary sweets all season. Counting down to Christmas with an advent calendar is a fun activity for your kids, but if they are filled with chocolate and sweets, it won't be so great for their teeth. Check out these simple sugar-free ideas to fill your countdown instead.

Holiday Activity Fun
Fill your child's countdown with special moments that they will cherish all year round. For each day of the month come up with a fun holiday activity that you can do together as a family. Some ideas include: watching a holiday movie, going ice skating, building a snowman and looking at Christmas lights. Write down the activity on a slip of paper and tuck one note into each day of your advent calendar.

A Puzzling Treat
Give your child a fun challenge with a customized puzzle. Draw a picture or write a special message on a blank puzzle. Break the pieces apart and place one puzzle piece in each day of your advent calendar. Every day your child can add the pieces together until they have a completed puzzle revealing a special holiday message or fun activity to do together.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Sugar-Free Trinkets
  • Story-A-Day

Northside Dental Group  
David Henry, DMD 
William L. Boteler, DDS 
Thomas L. Jones, Jr., DDS 
550 East Northside Dr. 
Clinton, MS 39056  
(601) 924-1555  
NorthsideDentalGroup.com

Sunday, 3 December 2017

Tobacco Risks on Oral Health

Learn what the American Dental Association has to say about tobacco risks on oral health.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Northside Dental Group  
David Henry, DMD 
William L. Boteler, DDS 
Thomas L. Jones, Jr., DDS 
550 East Northside Dr. 
Clinton, MS 39056  
(601) 924-1555  
NorthsideDentalGroup.com

Kids' Healthy Teeth During the Holidays

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by Elizabeth SanFilippo

Chances are good that visions of cookies, desserts and candy canes may be dancing in your children's heads this holiday season. While you will do what you can to limit their intake of these sugary treats, your kids will probably be eating their fair share of sugar at your family holiday parties. Despite their consumption of sugar, there are ways to keep your kids' healthy teeth and gums in shape and to minimize damage to their dental health.

Why Is Sugar Bad for Dental Health?
Whether your kids are eating chocolate cake, sugar cookies or peppermint candy, they are ingesting sugar. According to the American Dental Association (ADA), naturally occurring bacteria in the mouth feed on this sugar, and the byproduct is acid. This acid can eat away at tooth enamel, which can lead to tooth decay and cavities. The more time teeth spend exposed to sugar, the higher the risk that your children will face dental health problems. Hard candies, and sticky candies such as taffy and caramel, can be worse for teeth than other treats such as cake and cookies.

Brush after Eating a Sugary Treat
In general, the ADA recommends that everyone brush their teeth and gums at least twice a day for at least two minutes each time. Flossing should also be done at least once a day. During the holidays, encourage your kids to brush and floss even more than this, particularly right after they finish dessert. If a toothbrush is not handy, the next best thing to do is rinse. Encourage your kids to rinse their mouths with water - not soda or even sparkling grape juice ó which will help wash away sugar, acids and any other food that may be stuck to their teeth.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Limit Sugar Time
  • Make Dessert a Part of the Meal
  • Make Toothbrushing Fun
  • Schedule a Dentist Visit

Northside Dental Group  
David Henry, DMD 
William L. Boteler, DDS 
Thomas L. Jones, Jr., DDS 
550 East Northside Dr. 
Clinton, MS 39056  
(601) 924-1555  
NorthsideDentalGroup.com

Sunday, 26 November 2017

Regular Dental Check-Ups

Learn what the American Dental Association has to say about regular dental check-ups.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Northside Dental Group  
David Henry, DMD 
William L. Boteler, DDS 
Thomas L. Jones, Jr., DDS 
550 East Northside Dr. 
Clinton, MS 39056  
(601) 924-1555  
NorthsideDentalGroup.com

Surprisingly Simple Food Tips for Healthy Teeth

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by Donna Pleis

You already know the value of regular tooth brushing and flossing to the prevention of tooth decay and gum disease, but what you eat can help too. Here are a few tips for healthy teeth involving simple foods that may be more helpful to your dental health than you thought they were.

An Element of Strength
The mineral, fluoride, plays an important role in building strong teeth and bones, and ultimately protecting your teeth against tooth decay. This is why fluoride has been included in toothpastes like Colgate Cavity Protection and many community water supplies. But did you know it's also found naturally in many foods? Any fluoride you ingest is absorbed and distributed throughout the body, according to the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), though most of it deposited into your bones and teeth.

So, to give you and your family's teeth an extra bit of strength now and then, serve up foods with naturally high concentrations of fluoride. Most seafood is a good source of this because oceans are full of natural sodium fluoride. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), tea and gelatin contain fluoride as well. Carrots, beets, canned pork and beans also have significant amounts (who would've thought?), as well as infant formula, juices, canned tomato products and cheeses. And if you like baked potatoes, don't peel off the skin; that's where most of the fluoride is found. You can identify more fluoride-rich foods at the USDA National Nutrient Database.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • 'Moo're Dairy Please
  • Swish and Swallow
  • Candy and Chewing Gum
  • Nature's Toothbrush

Northside Dental Group  
David Henry, DMD 
William L. Boteler, DDS 
Thomas L. Jones, Jr., DDS 
550 East Northside Dr. 
Clinton, MS 39056  
(601) 924-1555  
NorthsideDentalGroup.com

Sunday, 19 November 2017

After-Hours Emergency Dentistry

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to about after-hours emergency dentistry.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Northside Dental Group  
David Henry, DMD 
William L. Boteler, DDS 
Thomas L. Jones, Jr., DDS 
550 East Northside Dr. 
Clinton, MS 39056  
(601) 924-1555  
NorthsideDentalGroup.com

Thursday, 9 November 2017

Diabetes and Your Dental Health # 3

November is Diabetes Awareness Month. This month we are featuring information found on MouthHealthy.org that discuss how diabetes can affect  your dental health. Below is one way that diabetes can affect your oral health.

Slow Healing 












Have you ever noticed a cold sore or a cut in your mouth that doesn’t quite seem to go away? This can be another way that diabetes may affect your mouth. Poor control of blood sugar can keep injuries from healing quickly and properly. If you have something in your mouth that you feel isn’t healing as it should, see your dentist.

To read all '5 Ways Diabetes Can Affect Your Mouth' visit MouthHealthy.org.

Northside Dental Group  
David Henry, DMD 
William L. Boteler, DDS 
Thomas L. Jones, Jr., DDS 
550 East Northside Dr. 
Clinton, MS 39056  
(601) 924-1555  
NorthsideDentalGroup.com

Thursday, 2 November 2017

Diabetes and Your Dental Health # 2

November is Diabetes Awareness Month. This month we are featuring information found on MouthHealthy.org that discuss how diabetes can affect  your dental health. Below are two ways that diabetes can affect your oral health.

Change in Taste 












Your favorite flavors might not taste as rich as your remember if you have diabetes. It can be disappointing, but take the opportunity to experiment with different tastes, textures and spices to your favorite foods. Just take care not to add too much sugar to your food in an effort to add flavor. Not only can this affect the quality of your diet, it can also lead to more cavities. If you have a persistent bad taste in your mouth, see your dentist or doctor.

Infections 












Diabetes affects your immune system, leaving you more vulnerable to infection. One common among people with diabetes is a yeast infection called oral thrush (candidiasis). The yeast thrive on the higher amount of sugar found in your saliva, and it looks like a white layer coating your tongue and the insides of your cheeks. Thrush is more common in people who wear dentures and can often leave a bad taste in your mouth. See your dentist if you think you have thrush or any other mouth infection.

To read all '5 Ways Diabetes Can Affect Your Mouth' visit MouthHealthy.org.

Northside Dental Group  
David Henry, DMD 
William L. Boteler, DDS 
Thomas L. Jones, Jr., DDS 
550 East Northside Dr. 
Clinton, MS 39056  
(601) 924-1555  
NorthsideDentalGroup.com

Antibiotics & Your Heart

Learn what the American Dental Association has to say about antibiotics and your heart.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Northside Dental Group  
David Henry, DMD 
William L. Boteler, DDS 
Thomas L. Jones, Jr., DDS 
550 East Northside Dr. 
Clinton, MS 39056  
(601) 924-1555  
NorthsideDentalGroup.com

Thursday, 26 October 2017

Diabetes and Your Dental Health # 1

November is Diabetes Awareness Month. This month we are featuring information found on MouthHealthy.org that discuss how diabetes can affect  your dental health. Below are two ways that diabetes can affect your oral health.

Gum Disease 












Notice some bleeding when you brush or floss? That may be an early sign of gum disease. If it becomes more severe, the bone that supports your teeth can break down, leading to tooth loss. Early gum disease can be reversed with proper brushing, flossing and diet. Research has shown gum disease can worsen if your blood sugar is not under control, so do your best to keep it in check.

Dry Mouth 












Studies have found people with diabetes have less saliva, so you might find yourself feeling parched or extra thirsty. (Medications and higher blood sugar levels are also causes.) Fight dry mouth by drinking water. You can also chew sugarless gum and eat healthy, crunchy foods to get saliva flowing. This is especially important because extra sugar in your saliva, combined with less saliva to wash away leftover food, can lead to cavities.

To read all '5 Ways Diabetes Can Affect Your Mouth' visit MouthHealthy.org.

Northside Dental Group  
David Henry, DMD 
William L. Boteler, DDS 
Thomas L. Jones, Jr., DDS 
550 East Northside Dr. 
Clinton, MS 39056  
(601) 924-1555  
NorthsideDentalGroup.com

Power Toothbrushes

Learn what the American Dental Association has to say about power toothbrushes.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Northside Dental Group  
David Henry, DMD 
William L. Boteler, DDS 
Thomas L. Jones, Jr., DDS 
550 East Northside Dr. 
Clinton, MS 39056  
(601) 924-1555  
NorthsideDentalGroup.com

Thursday, 19 October 2017

Risks to Oral Health During Pregnancy

Learn what the American Dental Association has to about risks to your oral health during pregnancy.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Northside Dental Group  
David Henry, DMD 
William L. Boteler, DDS 
Thomas L. Jones, Jr., DDS 
550 East Northside Dr. 
Clinton, MS 39056  
(601) 924-1555  
NorthsideDentalGroup.com

Sunday, 8 October 2017

Halloween Candy: Your Dental Health Survival Guide

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

With Halloween comes ghosts, goblins and goodies-and the sugar in those treats can play some unwanted tricks on your teeth if you’re not careful. 

Here’s why: The bacteria in your mouth are probably more excited to eat Halloween candy than you are. When the bacteria eat the sugar and leftover food in your mouth, a weak acid is produced. That acid is what can contribute to cavities. 

But don’t hang up your costume just yet. “Halloween is about candy, dressing up and having fun,” says ADA dentist Dr. Ana Paula Ferraz-Dougherty. “It’s OK to eat that candy on Halloween as a splurge as long as you’re brushing twice a day and flossing once a day all year long.”

To help you sort through the trick-or-treat bag loot, we have a rundown of some common candies and their impact on your teeth:
Chocolate
Chocolate is probably your best bet, which is good because it’s also one of the most popular kinds of candy handed out on Halloween. ìChocolate is one of the better candies because it washes off your teeth easier than other types of candy,î Dr. Ferraz- Dougherty says. “Dark chocolate also has less sugar than milk chocolate.”

Sticky and Gummy Candies
Be picky if it’s sticky. These are some of the worst candies for your teeth. “This candy is harder to remove and may stay longer on your teeth, which gives that cavity-causing bacteria more time to work,” Dr. Ferraz-Dougherty says.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Hard Candy
  • Sour Candy
  • Popcorn Balls

Northside Dental Group  
David Henry, DMD 
William L. Boteler, DDS 
Thomas L. Jones, Jr., DDS 
550 East Northside Dr. 
Clinton, MS 39056  
(601) 924-1555  
NorthsideDentalGroup.com

Tuesday, 3 October 2017

What are Cavities?

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about what cavities are.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Northside Dental Group  
David Henry, DMD 
William L. Boteler, DDS 
Thomas L. Jones, Jr., DDS 
550 East Northside Dr. 
Clinton, MS 39056  
(601) 924-1555  
NorthsideDentalGroup.com

Sunday, 1 October 2017

12 Tips for a Healthy Halloween

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

Halloween is around the corner, which for most children means bags of free candy and a chance to build a stockpile of sweets for the winter. No surprise, Halloween can also present parents with a variety of health and safety challenges. “It’s OK to eat that candy on Halloween but it’s important to have a plan,” says ADA dentist Dr. Ana Paula Ferraz-Dougherty. 

Here's how you can help your family stay MouthHealthy on Halloween and year-round.
Time It Right
Eat Halloween candy (and other sugary foods) with meals or shortly after mealtime. Saliva production increases during meals. This helps cancel out acids produced by bacteria in your mouth and rinse away food particles.

Stay Away from Sweet Snacks
Snacking can increase your risk of cavities, and it’s double the trouble if you keep grabbing sugary treats from the candy bowl. “Snacking on candy throughout the day is not ideal for your dental health or diet,” Dr. Ferraz-Dougherty says.

Choose Candy Carefully
Avoid hard candy and other sweets that stay in your mouth for a long time. Aside from how often you snack, the length of time sugary food is in your mouth plays a role in tooth decay. Unless it is a sugar-free product, candies that stay in the mouth for a long period of time subject teeth to an increased risk for tooth decay.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Avoid Sticky Situations
  • Have a Plan
  • Drink More Water
  • Maintain a Healthy Diet
  • Stay Away from Sugary Beverages
  • Chew Gum with the ADA Seal
  • Brush Twice a Day
  • Clean Between Your Teeth
  • Visit an ADA Dentist

Northside Dental Group  
David Henry, DMD 
William L. Boteler, DDS 
Thomas L. Jones, Jr., DDS 
550 East Northside Dr. 
Clinton, MS 39056  
(601) 924-1555  
NorthsideDentalGroup.com

Tuesday, 26 September 2017

Inter-Dental Cleaners

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about inter-dental cleaners.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Northside Dental Group  
David Henry, DMD 
William L. Boteler, DDS 
Thomas L. Jones, Jr., DDS 
550 East Northside Dr. 
Clinton, MS 39056  
(601) 924-1555  
NorthsideDentalGroup.com

Sunday, 24 September 2017

Cold and Flu Season: 5 Ways to Care for Your Mouth When You’re Sick

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org
When he’s feeling under the weather, ADA dentist Dr. Gene Romo says one thing always helps him feel a little more like himself. “Brushing my teeth when I’m sick actually makes me feel better,” he says. “My mouth feels clean, and in a way, I feel like my health is starting to improve.”

When you have a cold or the flu, taking care of your body is your top priority-and that includes your mouth. “It’s important to take care of your dental health all year round, but especially when you’re sick,” Dr. Romo says.

Here are some simple ways to care for your dental health when you’re not feeling well: 

Practice Good Hygiene
When you’re sick, you know to cover your mouth when you cough and sneeze. Don’t forget to keep up your dental and toothbrush hygiene as well.
According to the CDC, the flu virus can live on moist surfaces for 72 hours. “The number one rule is not to share your toothbrush anytime, but especially when you are sick,” Dr. Romo says.
You also probably don’t need to replace your toothbrush after you’ve been sick. Unless your immune system is severely compromised, the chances of reinfecting yourself are very low. “But if you’re still in doubt, throw it out,” says Dr. Romo. “Especially if you’ve had your toothbrush for 3-4 months, when it’s time to replace it anyway.”

Choose Sugar-Free Cough Drops
Read the label before you pick up a bag at the drug store with an eye to avoid ingredients like fructose or corn syrup. “Many cough drops contain sugar, and it is like sucking on candy,” says Dr. Romo. “Sugar is a culprit when it comes to cavities.” The longer you keep a sugary cough drop in your mouth, the more time cavity-causing bacteria has to feast on that sugar, which produces the acid that can leave holes in your teeth.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Swish and Spit After Vomiting
  • Stay Hydrated to Avoid Dry Mouth
  • Choose the Right Fluids

Northside Dental Group  
David Henry, DMD 
William L. Boteler, DDS 
Thomas L. Jones, Jr., DDS 
550 East Northside Dr. 
Clinton, MS 39056  
(601) 924-1555  
NorthsideDentalGroup.com

Tuesday, 19 September 2017

Tooth Whitening Is Not Equal to Tooth Brushing

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about tooth whitening not being equal to tooth brushing.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Northside Dental Group  
David Henry, DMD 
William L. Boteler, DDS 
Thomas L. Jones, Jr., DDS 
550 East Northside Dr. 
Clinton, MS 39056  
(601) 924-1555  
NorthsideDentalGroup.com

Saturday, 9 September 2017

You May Have Acid Erosion on Teeth

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by Jennifer Mitchell

Tooth enamel isn't just strong; it's the hardest substance in your body. It isn't indestructible, however, and can be eroded by substances that are stronger. Acid exposure can come from many sources, but with the help of your dentist, you can keep your enamel strong and healthy.

Symptoms 
Acid erosion on teeth can lead to a variety of symptoms that should be evaluated by a dentist. As the outer layer of your teeth wears away, you may experience tooth sensitivity. This sensitivity often leads to pain when you consume hot or cold foods and drinks.
Your teeth may also become discolored. This is because the enamel is white, unlike the sensitive, yellow tissue underneath is known as dentin. As the enamel erodes and exposes more of your dentin, your teeth begin to show more of its yellow color.
The appearance of your teeth can change in other ways as a result of acid erosion, depending on the case. The bottom edge of your front teeth may start to look transparent instead of its natural opaque. You may also notice your teeth look smaller or thinner than they used to. If you notice any of these symptoms, you may have acid erosion, and should see your dentist right away for an evaluation.

Causes 
There are just as many possible causes of acid erosion. Your favorite beverages, for example, may also be to blame for the initial sensitivity: According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), soft drinks are the most frequent source of erosive acids, most damaging due to their low pH levels. Other popular drinks, such as fruit juices, sports drinks and energy drinks, can also damage your teeth due to their acidity.
These liquids aren't the only possible cause. Frequent vomiting introduces highly acidic stomach contents to your mouth and can lead to acid erosion. This is a particular concern for pregnant women suffering from morning sickness, as well as those who struggle with bulimia or related eating disorders. Similarly, gastroesophageal acid reflux disease (GERD) is a condition that makes acid from your stomach back up into your throat and mouth involuntarily. This leads to frequent heartburn and, ultimately, the erosion of your tooth enamel. If you suffer from GERD, make sure your dentist is aware of your condition.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Prevention
  • Treatment

Northside Dental Group  
David Henry, DMD 
William L. Boteler, DDS 
Thomas L. Jones, Jr., DDS 
550 East Northside Dr. 
Clinton, MS 39056  
(601) 924-1555  
NorthsideDentalGroup.com

Saturday, 2 September 2017

Periodontal Disease and Obesity

Many medical professionals consider obesity to be a chronic disease. It is well understood that obesity is on the rise in the United States, and that younger and younger members of our community are becoming obese due to poor nutrition and eating habits. Research has demonstrated that obesity will increase the risk for hypertension, type 2 diabetes, arthritis, CVD, respiratory problems, and endometrial, breast, prostate, and colon cancers.1 It has also been demonstrated in a recent research study that obesity also increases the risk for periodontal disease, and it may be insulin resistance that regu¨lates the relationship between obesity and periodontal disease.1  It has also been found that individuals with elevated body mass indices (BMI) produce a higher level of inflammatory proteins.1

The classifications of being overweight and obese can pertain to more than 60 percent of American adults. It is even higher for some high-risk populations, such as African-American women, placing these individuals at greater risk for diabetes and cardiovascular dis¨ease. Some authorities estimate that two out of three Americans are overweight or obese, and projections of obesity trends for the future indicate an increase in the incidence of obesity in the general population.1

It is very critical for individuals to understand the obesity epidemic and to take proactive steps in addressing this issue with themselves and family members who are obese. Good nutrition and exercise should be stressed and individuals should be educated on the role that obesity may play in the development of diabetes, CVD and cancer. 

The dental professional will take a thorough medical history and review any medical issues which may point to the cause for the obesity and  refer the patient to his/her physician for evaluation. The oral health status will also be evaluated and treatment rendered based on the diagnosis. Emphasis will be placed on the reduction of the plaque and accompanying inflammation, both above and below the gumline. Home care should be reinforced, and patients should be encouraged to floss regularly and to brush twice daily with a toothpaste that offers antibacterial protection.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

Northside Dental Group  
David Henry, DMD 
William L. Boteler, DDS 
Thomas L. Jones, Jr., DDS 
550 East Northside Dr. 
Clinton, MS 39056  
(601) 924-1555  
NorthsideDentalGroup.com

Post-Treatment Care & Tooth Extractions

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about post-treatment care for tooth extractions.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Northside Dental Group  
David Henry, DMD 
William L. Boteler, DDS 
Thomas L. Jones, Jr., DDS 
550 East Northside Dr. 
Clinton, MS 39056  
(601) 924-1555  
NorthsideDentalGroup.com